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Are You Putting Your Dental and Overall Health at Risk?

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Are You Putting Your Dental and Overall Health at Risk? — The Connection Between Dental Health and Overall Health

The connection between dental health and overall health.When you have a healthy smile, you feel positive and confident. But a good smile is about more than appearance. The condition of your teeth and gums are important indicators of your overall health. With regular dental checkups, your dentist can catch problems early — before they become bigger, more expensive problems.

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Are You Putting Your Dental and Overall Health at Risk? — Barriers to Dental Care

Barriers to dental care. More than any other type of health care, people are most likely to skip dental care because they don’t have group coverage and can’t afford the bills. Without dental insurance to help cover the costs, many adults simply aren’t able to get the care they need.

Source:
“Non-Group Health Insurance: Many Insured Americans with High Out-of-Pocket Costs Forgo Needed Health Care,” Special Report by Families USA, FamiliesUSA.org/library, May 2015

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Are You Putting Your Dental and Overall Health at Risk? - Older Americans Not Getting the Care They Need

Older Americans not getting the care they need. According to a study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, fewer than half of older Americans have visited the dentist within the past year. Lack of dental care can cause a number of medical issues in people 65 and over. Studies indicate untreated dental conditions can introduce bacteria into the body that have been linked to conditions such as diabetes, pneumonia, and even heart disease.

Source:
“Few Older Americans Have Dental Insurance,” jhsph.edu, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dec. 5, 2016

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Are You Putting Your Dental and Overall Health at Risk? — Lack of Dental Coverage in Retirement

Lack of dental coverage in retirement. Dental insurance is one of the benefits you lose at retirement — and Medicare doesn’t cover most dental care. Yet, according to the study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, dental insurance status appears to be the biggest predictor of whether or not a person receives the dental care they need. And close to 90 percent of older Americans are without dental insurance. This absence of coverage — and resulting lack of proper dental care — can leave them vulnerable to serious dental problems and big out-of-pocket bills. A root canal and crown, for instance, can cost $1,000 or more.

Sources:
“Medicare & You,” 2019, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
“Few Older Americans Have Dental Insurance,” jhsph.edu, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dec. 5, 2016

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Are You Putting Your Dental and Overall Health at Risk? — Help With Dental Bills

Help with dental bills. Dental insurance helps make it easier for Americans to get the care they need to maintain their dental and overall health. When shopping for dental insurance, look for a credible company that provides affordable coverage that’s easy to understand and use. Some plans have waiting periods and deductibles before they pay benefits. If a plan has immediate benefits for regular preventive care, with no deductibles, you could have a dental checkup — and collect benefits — right away. Some plans cover 100% of preventive care. Also, look for coverage that doesn’t put a cap on the dollar amount of dental benefits you can receive in a year — or your lifetime. Finally, make sure the plan offers the coverage options you and your family need.

Download your FREE copy of “Guide to a Healthy Smile.”